What Temperature Should I Bake Bread at? Time for common bread types

There are some recipes that we have a few favorite for rolls, sweetbreads and bread. We make these enough so when the ingredients come together in minutes without looking at all of those hard-tofollow instructions on how to prepare it!

The problem is, I often forget what temperature we bake certain bread types at. Sometimes when preheating the oven to get it ready for baking one type of dough or another, myself and my family are left looking around wondering “Carrie! What’s wrong with these darn thermometers around here?”

You may be wondering how long it will take to bake your particular type of loaf. Well, this is where we can help! We have estimates for most types and sizes so that you’ll know if they’re worth the effort or not on a day-by date (or even hour!).

What Temperature Should I Bake Bread at

So you want to make your own bread? Well, we’ve got everything for the ambitious home chef. We took a look at different recipes and put together this handy guide on how long it takes (and what temperature) each type of dough should be left in order from easiest beginners level up through more difficult challenges like enriched or high gluten content flours!

Baking bread is an art form that requires careful attention to detail. A wide range of temperatures are used for different types, but most fall between 325-500° F (162 -260 °C). This temperature depends on what ingredients you choose as well how much total weight they account for in your recipe!

To find the most common temperatures and times for each bread type, we looked at all of our recipes. When there wasn’t a clear mode ( Temp that occurred most often), we split the difference between those two values to create an average temperature or time curve based on what was available from both high & low readings in order to make sure your recipe will turn out well no matter how hot/cold it gets!

Common Bread Baking Times and Temperatures

Lowest Temp Highest Temp Most Common Temp Time
Sandwich Loaf 350° F / 175° C 375° F / 190° C 350° F / 175° C 30-35 min
Whole Grain Loaf 350° F / 175° C 425° F / 218° C 375° F / 190° C 30-40 min
Dinner Rolls 350° F / 175° C 375° F / 190° C 350° F / 175° C 20-25 min
Hamburger Buns 350° F / 175° C 400° F / 205° C 400° F / 205° C 15-25 min
Hot dog Buns 350° F / 175° C 400° F / 205° C 400° F / 205° C 20 min
Rustic No-Knead Round 425° F / 218° C 475° F / 245° C *450° F / 230° C 35-45 min
Sourdough Round 400° F / 205° C 500° F / 260° C **450° F / 230° C 35-45 min
Banana Bread 325° F / 162° C 350° F / 175° C 350° F / 175° C 60-65 min
Zucchini Bread 325° F / 162° C 350° F / 175° C 350° F / 175° C 50-60 min
Bagels 400° F / 205° C 475° F / 245° C ***425° F / 218° C 25 min
French Loaf 350° F / 175° C 400° F / 205° C 375° F / 190° C 30-40 min
Baguette 375° F / 190° C 500° F / 260° C 450° F / 230° C 30-35 min
Pizza 450° F / 230° C 550° F / 288° C 500° F / 260° C 8-15
min
Babka 350° F / 175° C 375° F / 190° C 350° F / 175° C 40-50 min
Potato Bread Loaf 350° F / 175° C 375° F / 190° C 350° F / 175° C 35 min
Milk Bread Loaf 350° F / 175° C 350° F / 175° C 350° F / 175° C 30-35 min
Sweet Rolls 350° F / 175° C 375° F / 190° C 350° F / 175° C 20-25 min

*For those looking for an easy rustic bread, the most common method found was in a Dutch oven and involved preheating your dish before baking. You are required to cover it with lid then bake at low heat for 20-30 minutes without removing any metal from top; after this time remove lid but continue cooking until further notice (ensuring not too much burns).

** Sour doughs and temps vary from recipe to recipe. Most common recipes call for preheating the Dutch oven at 500°F (260 °C) before reducing heat back down again, this time only maintaining 450 degrees Fahrenheit inside the vessel while cooking traditionally takes place over 30 minutes with a lid on or 20 without one!

What Temperature Should I Bake Bread at

*** Bagels are boiled before baking, but we saw in most recipes that they’re placed into warm water. The exact temperature of this medium-high heat reduction is not specified by authors or bloggers who write about these items often for entry level expertise formats like Serious Eats’ “The Point” which has more difficult cooking methods than our recipe book does because it calls out temperatures rather than times and vice versa – so you’ll just need to experiment with both until getting close!

Bread baking temperature frequently asked questions

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